ESD

Thomas Ricciardelli of SelecTech sits in on the PCB Talk podcast to discuss the challenges of protecting components from the dangers of static electricity. ESD Systems stocks SelecTech’s SelectTile ESD Flooring System. The system is designed to create an ESD floor without the need for adhesives, copper strips, underlayment or padding. Please contact us for…

Read more A Conversation About ESD Control

This video covers the fundamental principles for protecting ESD sensitive components in a electronics production environment. The presentation includes an explanation and demonstrations of Electrostatic Discharge (ESD), the different models for ESD events, and material types used in an ESD Protected Area (EPA). To learn how to build an effective ESD control program that is…

Read more ESD Basics Training Video

 Most people notice a difference in the ability to generate static electricity when the air gets dryer (the % RH decreases). As an example, walking across a carpet can yield a charge of 35kV at 10% RH [very dry air], but will drop significantly to 7.5kV at 55% RH. In an electronics manufacturing environment lower…

Read more Dry Air and ESD Control

Electrostatic discharge (ESD) is the sudden flow of electricity between two electrically charged objects caused by contact, an electrical short, or dielectric breakdown. The natural phenomena of ESD has been occurring for as long as our planet has been around and apparently it has been a problem for much of that time.  A recent post…

Read more Controlling ESD in the 1400s?

The Made by Monkeys blog on the Design News website recently posted an article called ZAP! Another ESD Casualty about an electrical engineer’s experiences with electrostatic discharge (ESD). The article offers a perspective on ESD control from “then” compared to now. Not much has changed. ESD is a natural occurring event that can damage ESD…

Read more Stories of ESD Casualties

We posted this back in May 2012, and we noticed the video has gone viral recently with major news channels like CBS news. People do not start feeling charges from an ESD event until the discharge is at least 2000 volts while many common components used for manufacturing of electronics are susceptible to 100 volts or less  .  …

Read more ESD Testing Hurts